About Us

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  • Burden of Disease in Children Under the Age of 5 20%

The Hawa Project consists of men and women dedicated to the women and families of Liberia. We have come together to serve the vulnerable population and to decrease the maternal/infant mortality rate; to implement and support the Women’s Health Care Initiative; to conduct community awareness and positive frame of mind with people living with HIV/AIDS; to sensitize and facilitate workshops through the print and electronic media on the prevention of HIV/AIDS, violence against women, maternal health, sexual exploitation and child abuse.

At least 20% of the burden of disease in children below the age of 5 is related to poor maternal health and nutrition, as well as quality of care at delivery and during the newborn period.  Yearly, 8 million babies die before or during delivery or in the first week of life. Further, many children are tragically left motherless each year. These children are 10 times more likely to die within two years of their mothers’ death.

Join Us

The needs in Liberia are overwhelming; food, jobs, stability, and medical care are all hard to find. Walking through the shopping district the sights and smells are overwhelming. Each vendor hawks their wares from dilapidated wheel barrows, flip flops, undershirts, charcoal, and raw animal parts all in the open air awaiting the purchase.

One thing that is not scarce is the sight of pregnant bellies and babes in arms. The Liberian woman wears her child in a cloth wrap, locally referred to as a ‘lapa’. These babies, as young as 3 weeks, are bundled in brightly colored fabrics with layers of fabric draped over them to shield them from the harsh Liberian sun. The mothers continue on in the daily grind of seeking, bartering, trading, and exchanging to provide enough food to keep their dependents alive one more day.

Imagine attempting to grow a healthy baby with this meager amount of caloric intake day in and day out. Your one bowl of rice, or ‘soup’, is shared among your children and your spouse.

Four women die each day in Liberia, and 15 infants die each day during child birth and pregnancy.

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While we in the civilized world enjoy the bounties of a nearly endless supply of grains, fruits and vegetables, our Liberian friends on the opposite side of the globe struggle to obtain one meal each day.

Many expats enter the scene and bring their compassion and vision to the red dirt streets of Monrovia. Knowing that it takes work, sacrifice and organization to make a difference to the hundreds of women who die in childbirth each year.  But try we do.

The Hawa Project was born of the idea that many of us with an abundance of resources could join forces to assist and support our Liberian sisters to teach, model, grow and create a healthy future for women in Liberia. Namely by following the midwifery model of care and help woman of child-bearing age become educated and understand her body, as well as the needs she faces to assist her developing pregnancy.

 

As other sisters in midwifery around the globe, we are implementing The Hawa Project. Our program will train Liberian health workers over the course of the year and provide them with basic supplies. The programs will introduce the students to basic health topics such as sanitation, nutrition, anatomy, infectious diseases, medicines and maternity care. The women will also be trained through supervised deliveries and clinics with local patients.

During the trainings, the health workers will be supplied with equipment such as gloves, soap, towels, clamps, thermometers, baby scales, and blood pressure cuffs; as well as with medications like antibiotics for newborns’ eyes and medicines to prevent post-partum hemorrhage.

Partnerships in learning will be overseen by local Liberian midwives as well as midwives’ trained in the U.S.  Students from both Liberia and the United states will follow the same training program.

Contact

Get in touch! Send us a personal message using the form to the right, or call/text Dee Gordon at 801.836.5975. Don’t forget to follow us on Facebook and SHARE our page with your friends and family.

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